Things You Should Know When College Coach Recruiting

College recruiting is very competitive. Athletes and their families who embrace this fact tend to get more and better offers from college coaches. Ultimately it’s up to the athlete and family to determine which approach to take.

Here’s a secret that most families don’t know until it’s too late. College scholarships and roster spots don’t always get offered to the best student and/or the best athlete. They are offered to the best student and/or the best athlete who the college coaches know!

Now that the school year has started, here are 7 things every high school student athlete and their family should be doing to get the best possible offers.

· Academics. College coaches need good students more than they need good athletes. A coach can always make a good athlete a better athlete but can’t make a student better. An athlete can create more playing opportunities by getting a better grade point average.

· Athletics. Coaches want the very best athlete possible. Good athletes train, run and lift in the off season. They make it a point to be bigger, faster, stronger and more flexible. They play club sports at a higher level and may cross train by playing a second sport in school.

· Leadership. Every school and every coach is building tomorrow’s leaders from today’s leaders. Athletes show their leadership ability in school by participating in clubs which tend to build leadership qualities such as mentor/mentee programs, ambassador programs and school tour guides. On the field or on the court they are certified referees or they are coaches for youth sports programs in town.

· Citizenship. Every school is building tomorrow’s citizens from today’s citizens. Athletes who are involved in clubs, aside from sports, make their school environment a better place for all students. Volunteering in community programs also shows good citizenship because this makes the world a better place for all.

· Video. College coaches will always ask for a video. Videos are easier to make now than they were a few years ago. A coach is not going to waste their precious time to come and see an athlete play in a high school game unless they see a video first to determine if it’s worth their time and effort.

· Timing. Recruiting and associated offers start as early as middle school. Families who realize this start early and tend to get more and better offers.

· Time. The recruiting process is very time consuming and very convoluted. If an athlete is serious about playing sports in college, the family should be prepared to spend time every day, every week, and every month to get in front of as many coaches as possible. If time is an item that is short supply in a family’s schedule, they should consider outsourcing the project to qualified marketing service.